LIVE NOW: Discussion #1

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9 thoughts on “LIVE NOW: Discussion #1

  1. Can the panel reflect on the practices and images of burial that we saw during the pandemic of the burial of millions of people of color in Brazil and in the U.S.A and what can these practices of burial say about the notions that you have raised in your discussions about identities and bodies?

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  2. I loved the discussion about community-led repatriation processes. I was wondering if the panelists could speak more about how they square those processes with larger issues facing the University. In specific, I am thinking about the University of Pennsylvania’s ongoing displacement of Black people from their homes and neighborhoods in Philadelphia through gentrification and land grabs. How do we understand community-led processes within context of the neoliberalization of the university?

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  3. What role, if any, do you see the federal government playing in requiring institutions to account for the bodies in their collections?

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  4. How might emerging museum professionals contribute to these and other repatriation and reburial projects? What can we do to assist even though we do not necessarily have the expertise or experiences yet? Additionally, how can white/Euro-American museum professionals contribute/support without intruding into spaces that are not for us? (Thank you very sincerely for your time.)

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  5. Awesome discussion. My family successfully defended our Afro-Indigenous “Colored Cemetery” in Greenwich, CT. The restoration of our sacred ancestral burial site has begun and we hope to have a ceremony when our cemetery is restored next year. I am currently writing a book as well as making art regarding my experience with fighting for my ancestors who were almost erased from history. I was a graduate Cultural Anthro student, under Leith Mullins and Delmas Jones, at CUNY Grad Center back in 1991 and was one of those students who took it to the streets. ✊🏽✊🏽✊🏽

    http://radiantrootsboricuabranches.com/category/the-byram-african-american-cemetery/

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